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Resource Library

Welcome to the Peer Recovery Center of Excellence’s Resource Library. We have curated these resources in order to support peers and organizations who offer peer recovery support services (PRSS). Resources include toolkits, journal articles, multimedia, presentation slides, and more. You will find information regarding integrating PRSS into new settings, Recovery Community Organization (RCO) capacity building, PRSS workforce development, and best and emerging practices for the delivery of PRSS. As part of our MAI project, we have also gathered HIV-related resources here. You can search by topic, resource type, or simply browse the list below.

If you would like to check out products from the PR CoE, please see our Product Library.

Featured Resources

Journal Article

Lived Experience in New Models of Care for Substance Use Disorder: A Systematic Review of Peer Recovery Support Services and Recovery Coaching

Peer recovery support services (PRSS) are increasingly being employed in a range of clinical settings to assist individuals with substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring psychological disorders. PRSS are peer-driven mentoring, education, and support ministrations delivered by individuals who, because of their own experience with SUD and SUD recovery, are experientially qualified to support peers currently experiencing SUD and associated problems. This systematic review characterizes the existing experimental, quasi-experimental, single- and multi-group prospective and retrospective, and cross-sectional research on PRSS.

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Curriculum or Toolkit

Addressing Stress and Trauma in Recovery-oriented Systems and Communities: A Challenge to Leadership

Workbook addressing stress and trauma among Recovery Oriented Systems of Care.

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Curriculum or Toolkit

Cultural Humility Primer: Peer Support Specialist and Recovery Coach Guide

This primer was created as an entry level cultural reference for Peer Support Specialists and Recovery Coaches working in both substance use disorder and mental health fields. Sections include:

  • Principles of cultural humility
  • Classification of disabilities and information about both visible and invisible disabilities
  • Cultural perspectives of Black and African Americans, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Native American and Indigenous people, Latinx and Hispanics, and LGBT folks, with each section featuring an exercise with a real-life scenario

An appendix features a wealth of additional resources, including glossaries of terms and acronyms, references, and tools.

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Report

The Use of Peer Recovery Coaches to Combat Barriers to Opioid Use Disorder Treatment in Indiana

Indiana University-Purdue University Inidanapolis' Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health published this brief in order to illustrate a PRC's essential role in combatting the opioid epidemic in Indiana. Key points include the expectation that expanded use of PRC's will result in higher treatment access and engagement, and, thus, lower rates of opioid-related mortality. Additionally, several barriers need to be addressed before successful integration of PRC's into a work setting can be achieved.

Indiana University-Purdue University Inidanapolis' Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health published this brief in order to illustrate a PRC's essential role in combatting the opioid epidemic in Indiana. Key points include the expectation that expanded use of PRC's will result in higher treatment access and engagement, and, thus, lower rates of opioid-related mortality. Additionally, several barriers need to be addressed before successful integration of PRC's into a work setting can be achieved.
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Curriculum or Toolkit

TIP 64: Incorporating Peer Support Into Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services

This TIP supports learning about the key aspects, functions, and uses of Peer Support Services (PSS) in recovery from problematic substance use, which will help providers, supervisors, and administrators in SUD treatment programs better understand and respond to these changes.

This TIP supports learning about the key aspects, functions, and uses of Peer Support Services (PSS) in recovery from problematic substance use, which will help providers, supervisors, and administrators in SUD treatment programs better understand and respond to these changes.
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Curriculum or Toolkit

Tobacco-free Toolkit for Behavioral Health Agencies

This toolkit serves as a resource and guide for behavioral health agencies adopting a tobacco-free wellness policy for their facilities and campuses. It provides information on tobacco use among the behavioral health population, as well as a step-by-step guide to becoming a tobacco-free facility and treating tobacco use in clients and staff. It also suggests ways of incorporating a larger program of wellness that not only supports smoking cessation, but improves overall the mental, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, and spiritual aspects of one’s life.

This toolkit was created by the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center at the University of California, San Francisco in May 2022.

This toolkit serves as a resource and guide for behavioral health agencies adopting a tobacco-free wellness policy for their facilities and campuses. It provides information on tobacco use among the behavioral health population, as well as a step-by-step guide to becoming a tobacco-free facility and treating tobacco use in clients and staff. It also suggests ways of incorporating a larger program of wellness that not only supports smoking cessation, but improves overall the mental, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, and spiritual aspects of one’s life. This toolkit was created by the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center at the University of California, San Francisco in May 2022.
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Journal Article

Toward a Philosophy of Choice: A New Era of Addiction Treatment

Being given choices of institutions, levels of care, treatment goals/methods, service personnel, and service duration has historically not been part of the personal experience of addiction treatment in the United States. This article describes why addiction treatment professionals have been reticent to offer choices to their alcohol and drug dependent clients and why that philosophy is now undergoing reevaluation.

Being given choices of institutions, levels of care, treatment goals/methods, service personnel, and service duration has historically not been part of the personal experience of addiction treatment in the United States. This article describes why addiction treatment professionals have been reticent to offer choices to their alcohol and drug dependent clients and why that philosophy is now undergoing reevaluation.
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Website

Two-Item Conjoint Screen (TICS) for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems

Screening tool for current alcohol or drug problem.

Screening tool for current alcohol or drug problem.
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Multimedia

Understanding Latino Youth Recovery: Issues, Assets and Creating Resiliency

The body of work of peer support programs targeting youth is heavily focused on mental health models involving young adult peer mentors. In Connecticut, for example, some work has taken place involving youth 18-25 with mental illness and/or substance use disorder issues where peers provide support and hope to other young adults with these conditions. In 2017, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health noted a rise in the lifetime illicit drug use among Latino-Hispanic youth 12-17 and 18-25 from the previous year (2016). For 12 to 17-year old’s the percentage rose from 23.2 percent of youth in 2016 to 24.6 percent of all Latino-Hispanic youth in 2017. Similarly, for 18 to 25-year old’s, the percentage of lifetime used of illicit drugs rose from 51.1 percent in 2016 to 54.7 percent in 2017. It is therefore important to explore the options of addressing these rising rates through peer support models targeting Latino-Hispanic youth and young adults.

The body of work of peer support programs targeting youth is heavily focused on mental health models involving young adult peer mentors. In Connecticut, for example, some work has taken place involving youth 18-25 with mental illness and/or substance use disorder issues where peers provide support and hope to other young adults with these conditions. In 2017, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health noted a rise in the lifetime illicit drug use among Latino-Hispanic youth 12-17 and 18-25 from the previous year (2016). For 12 to 17-year old’s the percentage rose from 23.2 percent of youth in 2016 to 24.6 percent of all Latino-Hispanic youth in 2017. Similarly, for 18 to 25-year old’s, the percentage of lifetime used of illicit drugs rose from 51.1 percent in 2016 to 54.7 percent in 2017. It is therefore important to explore the options of addressing these rising rates through peer support models targeting Latino-Hispanic youth and young adults.
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Multimedia

Understanding the Role of Peer Recovery Coaches in the Addiction Profession

The addiction profession has a strong foundation of peer involvement. In fact, the earliest addiction professionals were the first peer recovery coaches informed by Alcoholics Anonymous. However, recent shifts within the workforce has led to some discomfort and questions about where the newly arising peer recovery coaches will fit into the overall services of the addiction treatment and recovery spectrum. This webinar will provide a comparison between a modern addiction counselor and peer recovery coach in regards to current roles, scope of peer practice, leadership development, ethical considerations and supervision needs. The presenter will also discuss different models of peer recovery supports, including details about how they are delivered, by whom, where, and reimbursement.

The addiction profession has a strong foundation of peer involvement. In fact, the earliest addiction professionals were the first peer recovery coaches informed by Alcoholics Anonymous. However, recent shifts within the workforce has led to some discomfort and questions about where the newly arising peer recovery coaches will fit into the overall services of the addiction treatment and recovery spectrum. This webinar will provide a comparison between a modern addiction counselor and peer recovery coach in regards to current roles, scope of peer practice, leadership development, ethical considerations and supervision needs. The presenter will also discuss different models of peer recovery supports, including details about how they are delivered, by whom, where, and reimbursement.
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Multimedia

Using Data To Advance Recovery-Focused Decision Making

Data-driven decision making for recovery and recovery support services is possible. Indiana has made some key policy changes at a state and agency level that increase the availability of data across agencies. The Recovery Supports Workgroup of the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA) is now using this data to evaluate gaps in key recovery supports, to make the recommendations, and track outcomes. In this session everyone will learn innovative ways of looking for, collecting, and utilizing recovery-specific data that drives and enhances recovery outcomes.

Data-driven decision making for recovery and recovery support services is possible. Indiana has made some key policy changes at a state and agency level that increase the availability of data across agencies. The Recovery Supports Workgroup of the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA) is now using this data to evaluate gaps in key recovery supports, to make the recommendations, and track outcomes. In this session everyone will learn innovative ways of looking for, collecting, and utilizing recovery-specific data that drives and enhances recovery outcomes.
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Curriculum or Toolkit

Using Motivational Interviewing In Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Effective substance use disorder (SUD) treatment requires providers to understand what an individual genuinely needs to do to change substance use behaviors. An essential element in motivational SUD interventions is helping people who misuse substances raise awareness of their values and hopes for a healthy life. Using strategic conversational approaches can increase clients’ internal motivations to take actions toward wellness

Effective substance use disorder (SUD) treatment requires providers to understand what an individual genuinely needs to do to change substance use behaviors. An essential element in motivational SUD interventions is helping people who misuse substances raise awareness of their values and hopes for a healthy life. Using strategic conversational approaches can increase clients’ internal motivations to take actions toward wellness
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Presentation Slides

Value of Peers

The role of a peer support worker complements, but does not duplicate or replace the roles of therapists, case managers, and other members of a treatment team. Peer support workers bring their own personal knowledge of what it is like to live and thrive with mental health conditions and substance use disorders. They support  people’s progress towards recovery and self-­- determined lives by sharing vital experiential information and real examples of the power of recovery. The sense of mutuality created through mutuality sharing of experience is influential in modeling recovery and offering hope (Davidson, Bellamy, Guy, & Miller, 2012)

The role of a peer support worker complements, but does not duplicate or replace the roles of therapists, case managers, and other members of a treatment team. Peer support workers bring their own personal knowledge of what it is like to live and thrive with mental health conditions and substance use disorders. They support  people’s progress towards recovery and self-­- determined lives by sharing vital experiential information and real examples of the power of recovery. The sense of mutuality created through mutuality sharing of experience is influential in modeling recovery and offering hope (Davidson, Bellamy, Guy, & Miller, 2012)
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Website

Video Trainings for the Promotion of Recovery-Oriented Services and Supports

Video Trainings from BRSS TACS:  Access video trainings that promote recovery-oriented services and supports by highlighting new knowledge areas, hot topics, and cutting-edge programs.
This webpage lists links to numerous training videos. All topics are relevant to Peer Recovery Support though you can choose a topic from the menu at the top of this webpage.
Topics include:

  • Peer Support Service
  • Recovery Support Services Funding
  • Recovery-Oriented Systems and Services
  • Systems Integration
  • Treatment and Recovery Supports

Note: Each training video listed has the date it was recorded. This website is hosted by SAMHSA.

 

Video Trainings from BRSS TACS:  Access video trainings that promote recovery-oriented services and supports by highlighting new knowledge areas, hot topics, and cutting-edge programs. This webpage lists links to numerous training videos. All topics are relevant to Peer Recovery Support though you can choose a topic from the menu at the top of this webpage. Topics include: Peer Support Service Recovery Support Services Funding Recovery-Oriented Systems and Services Systems Integration Treatment and Recovery Supports Note: Each training video listed has the date it was recorded. This website is hosted by SAMHSA.  
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Journal Article

What Are Your Priorities Right Now? Identifying Service Needs Across Recovery Stages to Inform Service Development

Substance use disorders (SUD) are, for many, chronic conditions that are typically associated with severe impairments in multiple areas of functioning. ‘Recovery’ from SUD is for most, a lengthy process; improvements in other areas of functioning do not necessarily follow the attainment of abstinence. The current SUD service model providing intense, short-term symptom-focused services is ill suited to address these issues. A recovery-oriented model of care is emerging that provides coordinated recovery support services using a chronic care model of sustained recovery management. Information is needed about substance users’ priorities, particularly persons in recovery who are not currently enrolled in treatment, to guide the development of recovery oriented systems. As a first step in filling this gap, we present qualitative data on current life priorities among a sample of individuals that collectively represent successive recovery stages (N = 356). Findings suggest that many areas of functioning remain challenging long after abstinence is attained, most notably employment and education, family/social relations, and housing. While the ranking of priorities changes somewhat across recovery stages, employment is consistently the second most important priority, behind working on one’s recovery. Study limitations are noted and the implications of findings for the development and evaluation of recovery oriented services are discussed.

Substance use disorders (SUD) are, for many, chronic conditions that are typically associated with severe impairments in multiple areas of functioning. ‘Recovery’ from SUD is for most, a lengthy process; improvements in other areas of functioning do not necessarily follow the attainment of abstinence. The current SUD service model providing intense, short-term symptom-focused services is ill suited to address these issues. A recovery-oriented model of care is emerging that provides coordinated recovery support services using a chronic care model of sustained recovery management. Information is needed about substance users’ priorities, particularly persons in recovery who are not currently enrolled in treatment, to guide the development of recovery oriented systems. As a first step in filling this gap, we present qualitative data on current life priorities among a sample of individuals that collectively represent successive recovery stages (N = 356). Findings suggest that many areas of functioning remain challenging long after abstinence is attained, most notably employment and education, family/social relations, and housing. While the ranking of priorities changes somewhat across recovery stages, employment is consistently the second most important priority, behind working on one’s recovery. Study limitations are noted and the implications of findings for the development and evaluation of recovery oriented services are discussed.
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Funding for this initiative was made possible by grant no. 1H79TI083022 from SAMHSA. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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